May 2017 GeoEdLink AGC logo

Your geoscience e-newsletter courtesy of the Australian Geoscience Council

      President's Opening Remarks |President's Report | Geoscience News | Geoscience Views | Geoscience Activities
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From the AGC President - Extract from the President's Annual Report

In the last twelve months the Australian Geoscience Council (AGC) has continued towards the goals we set ourselves in our Strategic Plan. While I list various successes below, including those since our last regular Council meeting, it is important to acknowledge how far we have come. Both your Chairman Dr Jon Hronsky and I have reflected in a number of forums on the value of having this plan, Jon at the Australian Earth Science Convention (AESC 2016) in Adelaide last June and myself at the International Geological Congress (35th IGC) in Cape Town last August. Some of the major benefits in having our one page, all encompassing 2015-2020 plan are that it helps us get on with the job; provides focus and a mandate for action; and reassures us that we are not missing any big picture (or big ticket) items.

We are now filling in the gaps that we were aware of a year ago, which include some of the more difficult to pin down goals. In each of the three Sections below, based on our Strategic Pillars, we address the initiatives that we have started to cover in the last twelve months.

Bill Shaw

Bill Shaw, AGC President


  •  Geoscience Education. We are starting to identify champions for Primary School geoscience that will help us provide more focus on this area of education. That will round out our education portfolio so that we have an understanding of the full scope of geoscience education in Australia and penetration into every aspect of it. Read more here.

  •  Geoscience Advocacy. Our media blitz during Earth Science Week (9-15 October 2016) resulted in three media releases which all got good traction. We have developed an approach whereby we can access a large number of government, media and other policy makers and have an understanding of our effectiveness. We have honed some radio skills (Brad Pillans and I both were on local stations) and one of our media releases helped raise the level of interest in supporting UNCOVER. As a result we have engaged more formally with our Media Adviser who can provide services to us and our member organisations on a piecework basis as required. This will help us develop and retain our Advocacy skills, which as indicated in our Chairman's report is an important long-term capability that we are working towards. Read more here.

  •  Geoscience Sustainability. We are now well along the path of planning for the first Australian Geoscience Council Convention (AGCC). This event will be held in Adelaide during Earth Science Week 2018 and based on the signed agreement between our eight member organisations we have contracted with a Professional Conference Organiser, formalised a Conference Organising Committee, finalised the logo, developed the website, and created seven subcommittees to manage various components of the event planning and organisation. The broad scope for this Convention is Big Issues and Big Ideas. Expect to see publicity for this event ramp up over the next few months with articles appearing in all of the publications put out by our member organisations. Read more here.

Read my full report here.

AGCC banner

In concluding these opening remarks I encourage you and all of our stakeholders to support the 2018 AGC Convention. Set aside some time to plan your involvement, whether through attending, presenting or partnering, and make sure your 2018 calendar has October 14 - 18 clearly blocked in for the AGCC!





Bill Shaw
President, Australian Geoscience Council

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Editorial

Failure to invest in the future is perhaps the worst mistake any society can make but investment is not just a matter of bricks and mortar, computers and software, football fields and cricket bats. For too long we have been focused on these elements within schools at the expense of teachers, teacher training, teacher professional development and quality time for teaching in schools. We need to make more time for teachers to teach as we review (yet again it seems) what else needs to be done to ensure our students and the nation thrive throughout the rest of this century and beyond.

Policies that have forced teachers and schools to do more with less have utterly failed us at the individual level and as a nation. At the end of the day teachers simply do not have the time they need to do the job they love, the job they signed up for and the job the community at large demands of them. Before we go anywhere near discussing how we make for a better education system for the nation we need to go back to basics and ask the question: How do we make better teachers?

The vast majority of teachers not only love their job, they are very good at it. In asking how do we make better teachers I am also asking under what conditions will our great teachers do even better? A classroom can have the best resources in the world available to it but unless the teacher feels valued, trusted and empowered to make the most of those resources the system will continue to fall short and fail our students. It is incumbent upon all of us to ensure that all reviews aimed at improving education remember to ask and answer these questions.

Greg McNamara - Editor, GeoEdLink
All feedback and submissions should be sent to the GeoEdLink Editor, Greg McNamara

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Geoscience Education News & Reviews

 Calling Superstars of Stem

Science & Technology Australia is now accepting applications for the inaugural Superstars of STEM program. The program strives to:

✪ Support 30 women employed in science, technology, engineering and mathematics to become highly visible public role models
✪ Build the public profile of 30 women employed in STEM through training in public speaking, media and communicating with influence and through creating opportunities to practice their newly acquired skills
✪ Directly encourage young women and girls to study and stay in STEM, by program participants speaking with them in their schools and workplaces and by providing prominent public role models for them to aspire to

Women from all STEM disciplines are invited to apply, in fields including but not restricted to mathematics, technology, biology, medical research, geology, marine science, microbiology, engineering, physics, astronomy, and more. Applications close 23 May 2017.
http://tinyurl.com/ljge2vo.

 2017 National Science Week school grant recipients announced

Congratulations to all the schools that have been successful in receiving grants of $500 or less to help them conduct a range and variety of science activities during National Science Week August 12-20.
http://tinyurl.com/k745vj9.

 Science literacy not improving

Despite some jurisdictional differences the most recent NAP science literacy report based on 2015 data indicates no significant national improvement between 2006 and 2015. However there is good news, and it is two-fold. Nationally science literacy did not decrease and the science literacy of female students exceeds that of male students compared with 2012 when males and females were on par. Students are sitting 2017 NAPLAN assessments this month.
Read the full report here and all reports here.

 National Science Statement released

The National Science Statement has a number of key points but included amongst them is that the National STEM School Education Strategy 2016–2026 is taking action to lift foundational skills in STEM learning areas, develop mathematical, scientific and technological literacy, and promote the development of the 21st century skills of problem solving, critical analysis and creative thinking.
Key points: http://tinyurl.com/mca2gt4
More detail: http://tinyurl.com/lrog77p

 CONASTA 66 - 2017 early bird registration closes soon!

IESO team 2016

CONASTA 66, scheduled for 9-12 July 2017 in Hobart will be where science meets art. The theme of the conference is The art of science. Delegates will explore the links between science and art as well as the art of doing science.

Early bird registration closes May 31.

The Teacher Earth Science Education Programme (TESEP) is offering a journey into the geological heart of Tasmania to experience FIRE.
F is for Fire from volcanoes (and nice warm log fires in the evening)
I is for Ice and the evidence for glaciers in the landscape (and any frost/hail/snow along the way)
R is for Rocks (of course)
E is for an Excursion that will ignite your passion for Earth Science!
This pre-CONASTA geological excursion into South West Tasmania is to view intensely folded Proterozoic rocks, early - middle Paleozoic shallow marine and carbonate sequences, late Paleozoic glaciomarine fossiliferous sediments and hydrocarbon bearing rocks. See the famous Jurassic dolerite sheets and Paleogene basalts. All this and more in the magnificent South West National Park within the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area. See the mighty Gordon Dam and the man-made lakes Pedder and Gordon. Get up close with glacial deposits, view stunning glaciated landscapes and become acquainted with the geologically recent active fault scarp at Lake Edgar.

To find all about the event here: http://tinyurl.com/lubn54y.

 Ken missed out but the teaching world won!

Ken Silburn, science teacher at Casula High in New South Wales was short listed for the Global Teacher Prize for 2017. Ken did not win. Maggie McDonnell, a teacher based at Salluit - an Inuit village deep in the Canadian Arctic, took the prize but in doing so everyone is a winner. Ken Silburn won for just being there and all teachers won because of the amazing recognition this major international prize brings to the profession!
About Maggie: http://tinyurl.com/mzuklam.
About Ken: http://tinyurl.com/lu5lnl6.

 AUGEN seeking sponsorship

The Australasian University Geoscience Educators Network (AUGEN) 2017 meeting will be held August 5 and 6. The AGC has provided support but more is always welcome. Sponsorship allows AUGEN to offer free registration and catering for attendees at the AUGEN meeting. In 2016 there were over 80 registrants and there is every reason to suppose this number will grow in 2017. Download the flyer here.
For more information contact: augenmail@gmail.com or kelsiedadd@gmail.com

 Discover Volcanism – Hawaii, February and July 2018.
Teachers on Hawaii
Great company, great rocks, fantastic trip!


See amazing volcanism first-hand and explore the active volcanoes of Hawaii for a week with a group of like-minded geoscience enthusiasts. The eight day Discover Volcanism trip is based in Hilo, Hawaii and takes the group through the basics of Plate Tectonics, hot-spot volcanism, volcano life cycles, volcanic products and more. Collect data, samples and learn how to develop scientific field notes and map in the field and in a lava cave. Participants also visit an active volcano observatory, a tea farm and winery, historical parks and learn about local traditions and culture that has developed through living with the hazards of volcanic activity. Also examine examples of engineering solutions to some unusual hazard problems in Hawaii. There is even time to walk on a black and green sand beach, swim in volcanically heated hot pools and snorkel on a coral reef with turtles and dolphins (if they appear).

The trip caters for a small number of people so that personalised learning experiences can happen for all the participants. The trip is also not overly expensive, with all the land transport, accommodation, breakfasts, some dinners, park entry fees covered. All you need to do is get to and from Hilo, Hawaii and make your field lunches and you're almost set. The February trip is open for everyone, the July trip is especially for teachers!

For more information you can visit http://geoetc.com/field-adventures/ or email Gary Lewis on gary@geoetc.com for more details.



 Hawaii - Land of Fire, September 23 to October 1, 2017.

Carefully crafted, curriculum linked itinerary specifically designed in conjunction with ASTA for teacher PD.

Teachers on Hawaii
This tour is escorted by Suzie Urbaniak,
winner of the 2016 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence
in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools and a Geologist.
➤ Take a Lava Boat ride to see the lava entering the Pacific Ocean, an unforgettable sight (extra charge may apply)
➤ See the olive green sand at Papakolea (Green Sand Beach), which gets its colour from olivine crystals created by volcanic eruptions
➤ Walk on newly formed crust, steps away from flowing lava
➤ Drive from sea level to over 4,000 metres in around 2 hours
➤ Experience the Zipline Tour of the Umauma Falls (optional)
➤ Explore one of the island’s best kept secrets, a volcano where you can see craters, eruptive fissures, lava tunnels, spatter ribbon, cinders and much more
➤ View the late stage rift between the two shield volcanoes – Waianae and Koolau
➤ Hike the world’s most recognised volcanic crater – Diamond Head

For more information download the flyer.



 Woolshed Creek open for business

The official opening of the new access arrangements for the Woolshed Creek fossil location in the ACT was a huge success! On a beautiful April afternoon the newly restored ACT heritage-listed fossil site on Woolshed Creek near Canberra Airport was formally re-opened during the 2017 ACT Heritage Festival by the ACT Minister for Heritage and the Environment, Mick Gentleman, MLA.
News: http://tinyurl.com/m6pv4x7
EarthCache: http://tinyurl.com/ka33my4.

 New edition of EES text book launched

Professor Lyn Beazley officially launched the new edition of the Earth and Environmental textbooks in late March. The first edition textbook, Exploring Earth and Environmental Science was released in 2011 to support the Western Australian EES curriculum. This large volume, 520 pages, served teachers and students well for several years. With the implementation of the WA version of the Australian Curriculum from 2015 it was decided that the textbook needed a major revision to align itself to the curriculum and to allow for important updates. A team of dedicated authors split the book into two volumes, Year 11 and 12, to produce relevant, easy to read and visually appealing textbooks for students. It is one of the best Earth and Environmental textbooks produced for schools and should be on every science teacher's bookshelf.
http://tinyurl.com/lwpf4jb
Follow this link for the ESWA year in review

   On-line resources - links and reviews   
 

 Future Earth digital teacher resource book for National Science Week

The 2017 88 page teacher resource book is divided into 3 sections - Early Years (F-2), Primary Years (3-6) and Secondary Years (7-10). Each section has a number of activities to support students' involvement in investigating, exploring, experimenting, designing, creating and communicating their understanding about what's involved in attaining and maintaining a sustainable 'Future Earth. It gives students the opportunity to explore and research a range of real-world scenarios. To further support teachers and students, two students journals are available to download.
Download the 18Mb PDF version here.
Download the 13Mb PDF version here.
Explore the web-based flip book here.
Find links to all the resources here.

 EarthSci - a desktop revolution in 3D!

EarthSci is a digital globe, built for visualising 3D geoscience data, both on and under the surface of the Earth. It allows users to display multiple GIS data and gocad models, to view multiple datasets together from a small, local scale, right out to a large, national or continental scale.
Video overviews of EarthSci from Geoscience Australia: http://tinyurl.com/m2t3ach

 Get in touch with 3D terrain

A new web application is making it quick and easy for people to use 3D printers to make terrain models of any place on Earth. TouchTerrain could be a powerful teaching tool in geology classrooms or anywhere terrain models would help students visualise what's going on.
http://tinyurl.com/zqn7pxc.

 A hand lens for your smart phone!

All smart phones have reasonable cameras on them. Now you can easily add an affordable magnifying lens to them too!
See what STELR have to offer here.

 Olympiads on-line: Making studying for the Earth and Environmental Science Olympiad exam even easier in 2017

For students enrolled in the Earth and Environmental Science Olympiad exam and especially for those not studying Earth and Environmental Science at school, this online facility has proved a big hit: http://asoeonline.edu.au/. New material is being added to all science programs; Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science and Physics. This will expand the questions available and make it the ideal study tool for anybody planning to sit any of the Australian Olympiad exams in 2017 or 2018. Don't worry about the cost, it's free for students and teachers to use, and you can go back over it as many times as you like!

 ScienceiQ competition dates for June 2017

ScienceiQ is a series of separate on-line science competitions conducted by the Science Teachers' Association of Western Australia (STAWA). The scienceiQ quizzes test student knowledge, skills and understandings in most areas of science.
Competition dates: http://tinyurl.com/gmppc9q

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President's Report

Australian Geoscience Council - President's Report to the Annual General Meeting
by Dr Bill Shaw

In the last twelve months the Australian Geoscience Council (AGC) has continued towards the goals we set ourselves in our Strategic Plan. While I list various successes below, including those since our last regular Council meeting, it is important to acknowledge how far we have come. Both your Chairman Dr Jon Hronsky and I have reflected in a number of forums on the value of having this plan, Jon at the Australian Earth Science Convention (AESC 2016) in Adelaide last June and myself at the International Geological Congress (35th IGC) in Cape Town last August. Some of the major benefits in having our one page, all encompassing 2015-2020 plan are that it helps us get on with the job; provides focus and a mandate for action; and reassures us that we are not missing any big picture (or big ticket) items.

We are now filling in the gaps that we were aware of a year ago, which include some of the more difficult to pin down goals. In each of the three Sections below, based on our Strategic Pillars, the first paragraph address the initiatives that we have started to cover in the last twelve months.

Geoscience Education

We are starting to identify champions for Primary School geoscience that will help us provide more focus on this area of education. That will round out our education portfolio so that we have an understanding of the full scope of geoscience education in Australia and penetration into every aspect of it. We are aware of the great work being done by Julia Ferguson through PALMS (in conjunction with ESWA), and of initiatives by the Australian Academy of Science such as the Primary Connections program. We hope to promote and further connect these and other resources to support an increasing awareness of Geoscience in primary schools.

The AGC's major vehicle for communication continues to be GeoEdLink, produced and delivered online by Greg McNamara, for which again three editions were issued since my previous Annual Report. The AGC Executive sees this publication as an excellent vehicle for communicating with all our stakeholders: our member organisations, including their Presidents, Representatives and Members; geoscience educators and communicators; and the general public interested in Geoscience. At this stage the subscription list is only 545. We would like to see this publication promoted more widely throughout Australian Geoscience by having you encourage joining the (free) subscription list. We also hope that the reports that the AGC provides after each of our Council meetings are picked-up by the editors of our eight member organisations. Links to the last three issues are available through the archive.

Our Geoscience Education Committee continues to support a number of organisations in Australia. While this is an acronym-rich area (TESEP, AUGEN, ESWA) we are confident we have reached most of the key players and are providing good connectivity at the levels of Secondary and Tertiary Education. If you are aware of others that should be on our list, let me know.

We are pleased to be an ongoing supporter of Suzy Urbaniak's program at Kent Street High School and again congratulate her for winning a Prime Minister's Prize, for her science teaching.

We continue to support the Australian Science Olympiads. Our national winners will compete in the International Earth Science Olympiad in Nice in late August.

We have continued to manage the 34th IGC Travel Grant Scheme for Early-Career Australian and New Zealand Geoscientists. Based on the applications in 2016 we made five grants totalling $22,400. It is always a hard task to finalise the list from many great contenders. The Scheme is open to practising geoscientists resident in Australia or New Zealand who hold a degree in geoscience (or equivalent). Each grant is in the range $2,000 to $5,000 and is intended to cover all or part of the cost of proposed travel. The application process re-opens soon on our website and we will be keen to see more great applications from industry this year.

Geoscience Advocacy

Our media blitz during Earth Science Week (9-15 October 2016) resulted in three media releases which all got good traction. We have developed an approach whereby we can access a large number of government, media and other policy makers and have an understanding of our effectiveness. We have honed some radio skills (Brad Pillans and I both were on local stations) and one of our media releases helped raise the level of interest in supporting UNCOVER. As a result we have engaged more formally with our Media Adviser who can provide services to us and our member organisations on a piecework basis as required. This will help us develop and retain our Advocacy skills, which as indicated in our Chairman's report is an important long-term capability that we are working towards.

Our first media release for this year was on Geoscientists Day (2 April this year) which generated lots of interest internationally.

We provided a submission to the National Review of Research Infrastructure and also promoted the views of AuScope, UNCOVER and the Australian Academy of Science National Committee of Earth Sciences.

We are supporting the Geological Society of Australia (GSA) initiative on Geotourism with a matching contribution of funds for an economic feasibility study on the Warrumbungle UNESCO Global Geopark proposal.

We have made substantial contributions to the Decadal Plan for Earth Science that is due to be released this year by the Australian Academy of Science. We see this as well-aligned with our Strategic Plan and are looking forward to helping disseminate this blueprint for the coming decade in Earth Science.

The AGC continues to support and engage with the National Rock Garden project in Canberra for which we provided seed funding to support the design of a building that will provide a focus for education based on this grand rock collection.

We have been pleased with the advances that the UNCOVER initiative has made this year and believe that this is already a focus point for cooperative research and policy development including academia, industry and government. We have taken the step of having the President of the AGC as your representative on this and other committees. This provides consistent communication of our views and better advocacy of our broad plan for geoscience.

We have again been represented at Science Meets Business (Melbourne, October 2016) and Science Meets Parliament (Canberra, March 2017).

Through our membership of Science and Technology Australia (STA) we have connected with their new CEO and made an impact in terms of specifically representing geoscience rather than only their broad objectives of the promotion of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Sustainability

AGCC banner

We are now well along the path of planning for the first Australian Geoscience Council Convention (AGCC). This event will be held in Adelaide during Earth Science Week 2018 and based on the signed agreement between our eight member organisations we have contracted with a Professional Conference Organiser, formalised a Conference Organising Committee, finalised the logo, developed the website, and created seven subcommittees to manage various components of the event planning and organisation. The broad scope for this Convention is Big Issues and Big Ideas. Expect to see publicity for this event ramp up over the next few months with articles appearing in all of the publications put out by our member organisations.

The call for papers and the sponsorship prospectus are imminent and will be widely publicised. We still need more volunteers to engage with the subcommittees to help achieve our goals and to provide balanced representation for all our member organisations.

One of the underlying reasons for holding this event is to bring together all our member organisations in a cooperative venture to support all aspects of geoscience in Australia. Some confusion is inevitable with the regular ASEG-PESA-AIG conference that will be held in Sydney in February (18-21) as the inaugural Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference (AEGC 2018). I have opened communication channels with the AEGC Committee to ensure that we provide mutually supportive messages at every opportunity going forward to maximise the value of both these events for all.

Our financial responsibilities continue to be well-managed by Brad Clements and his team at the AusIMM in Melbourne and I have a planned phone meeting with our auditor to again seek their assurances (when reported last year these were very positive).

My colleagues on the AGC Executive remain Dr Jon Hronsky (Chairman), Dr Ron Hackney (Secretary), Leanne Gunther (Administrative Officer), Brad Clements (Treasurer, taking over from Miriam Way in October 2016 and assisted by Prashanth Seetharaman) and Dr Neil Williams (PSM FTSE, Past President). I thank them all for their hard work, support, wise council and patience.

The representatives of our various member organisations have also worked hard in a voluntary capacity to support Geoscience in Australia and have again provided extensive help, support and advice to the Council on your behalf and I thank them sincerely for their efforts and support.

* * * *

The AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018) will be held during Earth Science Week next year (14-18 October, 2018). The purpose is to promote Geoscience as a major and essential field of Science in Australia. The theme is Big Issues and Ideas in Geoscience.

If you are interested in providing a paper, helping develop a Technical Session or championing a Thematic Session please contact:

Dr Chris Yeats - Scientific and Technical Program Convenor
chris.yeats@industry.nsw.gov.au

or myself, Dr Bill Shaw - President of the AGC
president@agc.org.au

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Geoscience Education Views

 Geoscience Education Views is prepared using opinion pieces provided by invited authors. Any views expressed may not reflect the views or policies of the AGC.

 Student success is the best reward and Ken Silburn should know

Ken Silburn
Ken Silburn

Dr Ken Silburn recently achieved celebrity status after being named as a finalist in the Varkey Global Teacher prize, one of the top 10 teachers in the world from over 23,000 nominations. However, this is just the most recent addition to the accolades he has received for his outstanding work in raising the profile of science and Earth Science amongst students and teachers.

At a time when innovation is firmly on the agenda Ken is leading the charge in inspiring the next generation to world-changing careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). And as the NSW coordinator for the TESEP (Teacher Earth Science Education Program) initiative he is at the forefront of promoting the study of Earth Sciences into the Australian curriculum.

When Ken started teaching at Casula High School in south-west Sydney in 2000, only eight Year 11 students were enrolled in science subjects for the Higher School Certificate.

Now two-thirds of Year 11 - more than 80 students - are taking at least one science subject to the HSC; nearly half of those are taking two.

In recognition of this outstanding work Ken was awarded the 2015 Prime Minister's science prize for excellence in teaching. Ken is highly motivated by his success but acknowledges it is student success that is the highest reward. "After 28 years of teaching I still get a buzz out of being in the classroom and seeing kids learn," Ken said.

Another factor, he said, that led to the recognition he has received, was being able to network and collaborate with so many great teachers outside of his own school. "I have been fortunate to be involved in our regional science teachers association and as the NSW coordinator for the TESEP initiative. It is amazing the practical ideas that you pick up, and then are able to share with your students."

Ken says it is important for teachers to get up-to-date information and teaching strategies, especially involving careers in the mining industry. Currently, anything that is to do with mining seems to get bad press. And when you couple this with the low supply of teachers trained in Earth Sciences, then we have a serious problem.

In a response to increasing the dialogue between talented science students across schools, Ken founded the iSTEM (Invigorating Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) program in 2012, and remains the program designer and coordinator. Through iSTEM, Ken gives interested high school students across Sydney's South West and beyond a chance to meet like-minded peers and engage in activities not usually available in their schools: anything from robotics workshops, space labs, and tours of nuclear reactor facilities, to visits to universities and museums. Showing just how deeply his commitment to the cause runs, Ken dedicated his share of the $50,000 Prime Minister's science prize money to taking iSTEM national.

iSTEM also runs an annual trip to the United States for Year 9-12 students and teachers from across Australia, where they experience a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to take part in the Space Academy Program at the US Space and Rocket Center in Alabama. Thus far the program has benefited more than 200 teachers and students. Importantly, it is also bucking the trend for low female enrolments in STEM activities, with much of the interest in the program coming from young girls.

Ken Silburn in India
Ken in India at NASA's Spaceward Bound Program

Ken is a global leader in his field. In 2011, he was one of only 16 educators across the globe to be selected to participate in the Advanced Space Academy Educators Course in the United States. In 2014, he was invited as a special guest to the US Space and Rocket Centre in recognition of his work, and was subsequently appointed an Ambassador for the Honeywell US Space Academy for Educators Program. Last year, Ken was selected as one of 28 scientists and educators worldwide - and one of only six Australians, and six teachers overall - to participate in the NASA Spaceward Bound Program in India's Ladakh region. He was also selected by the Australian High Commission to undertake a lecture tour and workshop series in India under the auspices of the Australia India Education Council.

Ken has been recognised with numerous awards for his teaching and community impact over the past ten years, and, in addition to the national and international awards mentioned above, was recently named both a Champion of the West in the Daily Telegraph's Go West awards, and a Hero of Liverpool by the Mayor and Councillors of Liverpool City Council.

To find out more about iSTEM and Space Camp follow these links:
http://www.istem.com.au/iSTEM/Welcome.html
http://www.spacecamp.com.au/Spacecamp/Space_Academy.html.

Prime Minister's Science prizes for teachers:
http://tinyurl.com/mw9h92k
Global Teacher Prize:
http://www.globalteacherprize.org/

TESEP in NSW:
http://www.tesep.org.au/new-south-wales.html


Ken Silburn is Head Science Teacher at Casula High School
and recipient of the 2015 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools
kenneth.silburn@det.nsw.edu.au

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Geoscience Education Deadlines, Events & Activities

   Deadlines   
 

 Superstars of STEM
Applications close 23 May 2017
http://tinyurl.com/ljge2vo.

 Science Talent Search 2017
Registrations close 29 May 2017
http://www.sciencevictoria.com.au/sts/.

 National Youth Science Forum 2018
Applications close 31 May 2017
https://www.nysf.edu.au/.

 CONASTA 2017, Hobart 2-12 July
Early bird registration closes 31 May 2017
http://tinyurl.com/zs7wczz.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams
Registrations close for all exams 19 July 2017
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.

 Science Fair entries due, Canberra, 25-26 August
http://tinyurl.com/lqxo2uo.

 64th Queensland Science contest 2017, Brisbane, 9 October 2017
Register by October 9, entries due October 13 to 14.
http://tinyurl.com/lhr6fre.


   Events and Activities   
 

 Big Science Competition 2017
Competitions held any day between 17 & 24 May
http://tinyurl.com/zn7tvlk.

 TESEP Webinar, 23 May 2017
Rocking junior high school. Just what rocks should and should not be in the classroom?
http://tinyurl.com/nyjxvz3.

 STEM in the Middle Years, Adelaide, 24 May 2017
Practical investigations that develop STEM skills and disposition
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

 Investigations in Primary Science, Adelaide, 2 June 2017
STEM Focus
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

 TESEP PD, Melbourne 15 June 2017
Riding the Climate Rollercoaster
http://tinyurl.com/n5e4agn.

 TESEP field trip and PD, NSW South Coast 15 June 2017
NSW South Coast Teacher Geology Field Trip with PD1 and PD9 content
http://tinyurl.com/m7molp6.

 TESEP PD, Melbourne 16 June 2017
Wet rocks
http://tinyurl.com/k24ol7h.

 Designing STEM Tasks, Adelaide, 16 June 2017
Middle Years
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

  STEM in action forum, Gladstone, 20 June 2017
Middle Years
http://tinyurl.com/m23vtpf.

 Designing STEM Tasks, Adelaide, 23 June 2017
Primary Years
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

 TESEP PD, Geelong-Otways PD and field trip, 03-05 July 2017
Round and round with rocks - July 3
Plate Tectonics - July 4
Otways field trip - July 5

 CONASTA 2017, Hobart, 7-12 July
AGCC banner



http://tinyurl.com/lubn54y.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams
Registrations close for all exams 19 July 2017
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams, August 2017
   •   Chemistry exam August 2
   •   Earth and Environmental Science exam August 4
   •   Biology exam August 7
   •   Physics exam August 9
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.

 Australasian University Geoscience Educators Network (AUGEN) meeting, Sydney, 5-6 August
For more information contact kelsiedadd@gmail.com.

 International Earth Science Olympiad 2017, France, 22-29 August
Explore details here and consider sitting the 2017 Australian exams to attend the 2018 summer school and maybe represent Australia at IESO 2018.
http://univ-cotedazur.fr/ieso2017/events/ieso2017.

 Science Fair entries due, Canberra, 25-26 August
http://tinyurl.com/lqxo2uo.

 Improving STEM Education, Melbourne, 29-30 August
http://tinyurl.com/n372zcu.

 64th Queensland Science contest 2017, Brisbane, 9 October 2017
Register by October 9, entries due October 13 to 14.
http://tinyurl.com/lhr6fre.

 SASTA Early Careers Teachers Conference 2017, Adelaide, 13 October 2017
Primary Years
http://tinyurl.com/m7g9vaw.

    
✱✱✱  2018  ✱✱✱



 Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference, February 18-21, 2018
http://www.aegc2018.com.au/
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 8th GeoSciEd Conference and 8th EnsinoGEO, Campinas Brazil, July 22-27, 2018
http://tinyurl.com/m7r4gc7.

 AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018), Adelaide, 14-18 October 2018
https://www.agcc.org.au/
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 GeoEdLink will list your event here!
If you have an upcoming Earth and Environmental Science education related event GeoEdLink will list its details here. Send your event details to the GeoEdLink editor. An event name, date, location and web site link are essential. The next GeoEdLink will be published in February-March 2017.

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GeoEdLink is a newsletter published by the Australian Geoscience Council.

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