February-March 2017 GeoEdLink AGC logo

Your geoscience e-newsletter courtesy of the Australian Geoscience Council

      President's Opening Remarks |President's Report | Geoscience News | Geoscience Views | Geoscience Activities
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From the AGC President

Since my December report, the AGC has been quietly but actively taking forward the policies in our Strategic Plan which we believe is still appropriate. It is worth again drawing your attention to it (http://bit.ly/AGC_StrategicPlan_flier) as a great exercise in how to achieve enormous success by engaging with all the stakeholders, listening to a wide and diverse range of views, looking for common threads, providing leadership, developing a plan, fleshing it out and following through. This is a series of techniques that are at the core of almost every management and leadership textbook, but there is nothing more satisfying than actually getting to see the plan on paper and then following through.

The flier referred to above contains the AGC's Vision and our Mission. We have identified three Strategic Pillars - Education, Advocacy and Sustainability - and under each Strategic Pillar there are Strategies. For each of the Strategies there are Tactics and for each Tactic there is a line item in our budget.

Bill Shaw

Bill Shaw, AGC President


  •  Education. In education, our Strategic Plan addresses all aspects of Geoscience Education, both awareness of geoscience and training in it. We took on a big education task, to consider Public, Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Continuing and Policy aspects of Education. Some areas are advancing more than others, but as they become established we will pick up the other threads.

  •  Advocacy. We updated our submission to the National Review of Research Infrastructure and provided a submission to the Review into Cooperative Research Centres. We have provided consistent support for UNCOVER, AuScope and other current research as well as a substantial contribution to the Australian Academy of Science's Decadal Plan for Earth Sciences.

  •  Sustainability. To continue to do what we have started, and to be able to achieve more, we are holding a Convention in 2018 in Adelaide. This will help us achieve two strategies: getting our eight Member Organisations to work together and providing us with more funding to be able to better support our Education and Advocacy strategic pillars.

Read my full report here.

AGCC banner

In concluding these opening remarks I encourage you and all of our stakeholders to support the 2018 AGC Convention. Set aside some time to plan your involvement, whether through attending, presenting or partnering, and make sure your 2018 calendar has October 14 - 18 clearly blocked in for the AGCC!





Bill Shaw
President, Australian Geoscience Council

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Editorial

Education, and science education in particular is always under pressure to produce quality students but there has always been another pressure; the pressure to teach to the curriculum. These two forces don't always pull in the same direction and in many places around the world the curriculum is the target of special interest groups. One extreme view might be that scientists are a special interest group with no more rights to a say in the structure of the curriculum than anti-vaccine advocates or flat Earthers but, at least in Australian society, science is generally valued and is accorded a significant space in the over-crowded curriculum. Nonetheless, we should not take the position of science in the curriculum for granted anymore than we should take the 25% allocated to Earth and Space in the science curriculum for granted.

In many countries we see the value for science and the respect of science diminishing even as the role of science in the lives of everybody on the planet grows ever more important and indispensable. In the United States and elsewhere moves to limit or curtail the teaching of evolution and climate science highlight this. Sadly we also hear echoes of those sentiments here too. We need to be mindful of this and stand up to the demands for change made by special interest groups intent on modifying the curriculum to suit agendas that have nothing to do with truly improving the teaching of science. Where genuine change to improve the curriculum is mooted we should, after due consideration, support it. Unfortunately, around the world populist and alternative right (alt-right) political groups are seeking and gaining power. This is re-energising those in their ranks and elsewhere who have previously sought to impose unscientific views about evolution and other subject areas on the public through changes to the education system. Just as we have sought to maintain Earth Science in the science curriculum we should spare no effort to defend the role of science more generally should the need arise in these changing times.

Greg McNamara - Editor, GeoEdLink
All feedback and submissions should be sent to the GeoEdLink Editor, Greg McNamara

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Geoscience Education News & Reviews

 Big Science Competition

The Big Science Competition is a great challenge for year 7 to 10 students. It's a 50 minute, 30 multiple choice competition testing critical thinking and problem solving skills, not just factual recall. Questions are set in real-world contexts, making them relatable and interesting. All questions are aligned with the Australian Curriculum – Science:
  •  Science inquiry skills: including identifying and formulating questions and hypotheses for testing; making predictions, collecting, analysing and evaluating data and drawing valid conclusions; interpreting and communicating information through appropriate representations and media.
  •  Science as a human endeavour: including the development of science knowledge and processes across cultures and over time; its application in areas of human endeavour; its significance in informing personal and societal decisions and actions; and the influence society has on science.
  •  Science understanding: core concepts relating to Biological, Chemical, Earth and Space Sciences, and Physical Sciences that are designated at each stage

Register before Wednesday 19 April 2017 and you will go in a draw to win a Science Experience to meet the Surfing Scientist Ruben Meerman in the comfort of your own school. Only Australian schools are eligible to go into the draw. Read more here.
Registrations for the pen & paper-based format close 19 April 2017.
Registrations for the online version close 10 May 2017.
http://tinyurl.com/zn7tvlk.

 Science Talent Search still going strong - enter now!

The Science Talent Search is a Victorian program founded in 1952, making it one of the longest running events of its type anywhere. The Science Talent Search has three main aims:
   •   To stimulate ongoing interest in science
   •   To promote the direct involvement of students in science and its communication
   •   To give the public an opportunity to see the quality of science achieved by students

There are opportunities for Primary (F-6) and Secondary (7-10) students, senior students and groups. Competitions cover experimental research, creative writing, working models, inventions, posters, games, simulations, photography and video production.

Registration opened Monday February 27 and closes Monday May 9.
Find out more here.

 CONASTA 66 - 2017 is not far away!

IESO team 2016

CONASTA 66, scheduled for July 2017 in Hobart will be where science meets art. The theme of the conference is The art of science. Delegates will explore the links between science and art as well as the art of doing science.

Early bird registration opens March 1 and closes May 31.
To find all about the event here: http://tinyurl.com/zs7wczz.

 Five places at the Asian Science Camp up for grabs

The Asian Science Camp brings together around 200 talented young people in celebration of science and friendship. This year, the 12th Asian Science Camp will be held in Perak, Malaysia and five Australian students will be accepted to attend. The six-day camp aims to promote international cooperation and networks among high-achieving young science students of the next generation in Asia and Oceania. To be eligible students must be:
   •   an Australian citizen or permanent resident
   •   currently studying a science or maths subject in Year 12 or first year university (or taking a gap year with a deferred university placement)
   •   aged between 17 and 22 years
and have fulfilled one or more of the following criteria:
   •   attended an Australian Science Olympiad Summer School in 2016 or 2017
   •   achieved a high distinction in any Australian Science Olympiad Exam in 2016
   •   have achieved a high distinction in the 2016 Big Science Competition senior paper
   •   have not previously attended an Asian Science Camp (previously unsuccessful students can reapply)

Applications close 11.30pm Sunday 26 March, 2017.
http://tinyurl.com/zdytw8z.

 AUGEN rescheduled to August

The organising committee of the Australasian University Geoscience Educators Network (AUGEN) meeting has postponed the 2017 event, originally planned for January, until August 5 and 6. Due to the late call for abstracts and registration, the response was less than hoped for and a late January event would have been disappointing for all concerned. The event will be held at the University of Sydney and will be similar to the originally advertised program but a new program will be issued soon.
For more information contact: augenmail@gmail.com or kelsiedadd@gmail.com

 Discover Volcanism – Hawaii, February and July 2018.
Teachers on Hawaii
Great company, great rocks, fantastic trip!


See amazing volcanism first-hand and explore the active volcanoes of Hawaii for a week with a group of like-minded geoscience enthusiasts. The eight day Discover Volcanism trip is based in Hilo, Hawaii and takes the group through the basics of Plate Tectonics, hot-spot volcanism, volcano life cycles, volcanic products and more. Collect data, samples and learn how to develop scientific field notes and map in the field and in a lava cave. Participants also visit an active volcano observatory, a tea farm and winery, historical parks and learn about local traditions and culture that has developed through living with the hazards of volcanic activity. Also examine examples of engineering solutions to some unusual hazard problems in Hawaii. There is even time to walk on a black and green sand beach, swim in volcanically heated hot pools and snorkel on a coral reef with turtles and dolphins (if they appear).

The trip caters for a small number of people so that personalised learning experiences can happen for all the participants. The trip is also not overly expensive, with all the land transport, accommodation, breakfasts, some dinners, park entry fees covered. All you need to do is get to and from Hilo, Hawaii and make your field lunches and you're almost set. The February trip is open for everyone, the July trip is especially for teachers!

For more information you can visit http://geoetc.com/field-adventures/ or email Gary Lewis on gary@geoetc.com for more details.



 Flying classroom visits the South Magnetic Pole

When geologist and teacher Suzy Urbaniak won the 2016 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science award she was also offered a trip by the Antarctica Veterans Association but in line with her student-centric philosophy she organised to also extend the gift to her students. On January 26 Suzy and students flew from Perth to the South Magnetic Pole in an amazing 12-hour round trip, flying over Casey Station on the way. The visually stunning trip was complimented with simple experiments conducted on-board. University of Western Australia PhD students also on the flight ran some experiments to detect cosmic rays and measure the Earth's magnetic field as they approached the South Magnetic Pole.
http://tinyurl.com/jj56pfu.

 Ken Silburn short listed

Ken Silburn, 2016 recipient of the Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools, has been short listed in the top 10 for the Varkey Global Teacher Prize. The Global Teacher Prize is a US$1 million award presented annually to an exceptional teacher who has made an outstanding contribution to their profession. The prize serves to underline the importance of educators and the fact that, throughout the world, their efforts deserve to be recognised and celebrated. It seeks to acknowledge the impacts of the very best teachers – not only on their students but on the communities around them.
The AGC congratulates Ken and wishes him all the best for the announcement of the winner on March 19!
http://www.globalteacherprize.org/

   On-line resources - links and reviews   
 

 New curriculum resources released

The Resources section of the Australian Curriculum website has been updated with some great new features, designed to assist teachers with the implementation of the Australian Curriculum. They are:

Curriculum Connections
This site provides examples of how the Australian Curriculum can be organised to support interdisciplinary learning. Educators can use these resources to weave content from the dimensions of the Australian Curriculum in ways that are authentic and meaningful. The Outdoor Learning section will be of use to those planning science lessons in the great outdoors.

Mathematics Proficiencies
The proficiency strands are Understanding, Fluency, Problem-Solving and Reasoning. They describe how content is explored or developed, that is, the thinking and doing of mathematics. They provide the language to build in the developmental aspects of the learning of mathematics and have been incorporated into the content descriptions of the three content strands.

 Great balls of fire!

Fireballs in the Sky is an innovative Australian citizen science program that invites people around the world to learn about fireball and meteorite science and contribute fireball sightings via a user-friendly smartphone app. The app has proved very successful in the location of recent meteorites in Western Australia. The Fireballs team has also put together some excellent resources and the fact sheets and activities are available in great PDF booklet here. These resource cover a wide range of topics including aboriginal perspectives and have useful literacy and numeracy content as well.
http://fireballsinthesky.com.au/

 Get ready for the Big Science Competition 2017!

The Big Science Competition is an easy way to challenge students from years 7 to 10 and track their performance against state or national averages. It's a 50 minute, 30 multiple choice competition testing critical thinking and problem solving skills, not just factual recall, so you can find out what's really going on inside their heads. Questions are set in real-life, contemporary contexts, making them relatable (and interesting).Download sample questions, take a look at how you can use the results in your classroom and download the technology requirements for the online competition: http://tinyurl.com/gomewk7.

 Geoscience educators tell their stories

Have you ever wondered how some of the people doing great public communication and education in the field of geosciences ended up doing what they do? Wonder no more! The International Geoscience Organisation has compiled an ongoing list of over 60 My Earth science educator story stories. Find them all here and if you think your story should be told too just send it to them. Find all the details here!

 Olympiads on-line: Making studying for Earth and Environmental Science Olympiad exam even easier in 2017

For students enrolled in the Earth and Environmental Science Olympiad exam and especially for those not studying Earth and Environmental Science at school, this online facility has proved a big hit: http://asoeonline.edu.au/. New material is being added to all science programs; Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Environmental Science and Physics. This will expand the questions available early in 2017 and make it the ideal study tool for anybody planning to sit any of the Australian Olympiad exams in 2017 or 2018 and its free for students and teachers to use.

 ScienceiQ competition dates for 2017

ScienceiQ is a series of separate on-line science competitions conducted by the Science Teachers' Association of Western Australia (STAWA). The scienceiQ quizzes test student knowledge, skills and understandings in most areas of science.
Competition dates: http://tinyurl.com/gmppc9q

 Science ASSIST gone but not forgotten

Science ASSIST, the free national online advisory service for school science educators and technicians, is now in care and maintenance pending a successful funding application. The good news is that the Science ASSIST website will continue to operate and there will continue to be free access to all the resources created over the life of the project.
https://assist.asta.edu.au/

 AGC Travel Grant reports

In 2015, 11 early-career geoscientists from Australia and New Zealand shared a total grant funding pool of $30, 000 to support their world-class research overseas. The Travel Grants have been made possible through a trust fund administered by Australian Geoscience Council and the Australian Academy of Science, which was set up after the 34th International Geological Congress in Brisbane in August 2012. Recipients must submit a report to the AGC detailing their experiences and the activities they carried out during their travels.
Read the reports here: http://tinyurl.com/jcb3lc9

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President's Report

Australian Geoscience Council - President's Report by Dr Bill Shaw

Since my December report, the AGC has been quietly but actively taking forward the policies in our Strategic Plan which we believe is still appropriate. It is worth again drawing your attention to it (http://bit.ly/AGC_StrategicPlan_flier) as a great exercise in how to achieve enormous success by engaging with all the stakeholders, listening to a wide and diverse range of views, looking for common threads, providing leadership, developing a plan, fleshing it out and following through. This is a series of techniques that are at the core of almost every management and leadership textbook, but there is nothing more satisfying than actually getting to see the plan on paper and then following through.

It is worth elaborating on this because not only does it help to remind us all of the big picture (what we are trying to do for Geoscience in Australia) but it is a model that can be applied to many other endeavours that we all encounter continuously in our daily lives. I have been running a course in Mining Grade Control for more than 25 years. Throughout this course the same theme recurs: if you want to get something done, develop an agreed plan, put resources in place, get started and have continuous review.

The flier referred to above contains the AGC's Vision (perhaps the hardest part of developing any plan is to get agreement about the objectives) and our Mission (the path we can take to achieve our Vision). We identified three Strategic Pillars (Education, Advocacy and Sustainability; more about these below). Under each Strategic Pillar there are Strategies - these are the big areas we are now working in such as Support Secondary School Geoscience. For each of the Strategies there are Tactics (specific initiatives as bullet points such as GeoEdLink newsletter for teachers) and for each Tactic there is a line item in our budget.

Having just had approval for this year's budget at our last AGC Representatives' Meeting I can assure you that we are on track to continue our support for all our current initiatives. So, having again talked about how we have gotten this far (because it works, and you may find it a useful approach to achieve many things in life), let's look at some of the things we are doing:

Education

In education, our Strategic Plan addresses all aspects of Geoscience Education, both awareness of geoscience and training in it. We took on a big education task, to consider Public, Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, Continuing and Policy aspects of Education. Some areas are advancing more than others, but as they become established we will pick up the other threads.

The 34th International Geological Congress travel grant scheme for early-career Australian and New Zealand Geoscientists has continued and for this year we have just awarded $22, 400 to five successful applicants. All up there were 48 applications seeking assistance for geoscientific research and to attend conferences in places such as Greenland, New Zealand, Switzerland, Chile, Canada, Croatia and Japan. The successful recipients are again required to provide a report on their application of the funds and some of those are now being readied for circulation. It is disappointing not to be able to support all the proposals as they are so worthwhile. If you are aware of other sources of funds that you are looking to apply, please let us know.

We have this year again committed support to the Kent Street Senior High School CoRE program developed by Suzy Urbaniak and we continue to support ESWA, TESEP, AUGEN and Australian Science Olympiads. We are still seeking champions for Geoscience in Primary Education and hope to create a support network of teachers with this special interest.

In terms of educating the public about geoscience we are looking for nominations for another National Geoscience Champion. Our website provides more details.

The next public media awareness campaign on Geoscience will be around Geoscientist Day. This is traditionally celebrated on the first Sunday in April (so this year April 2nd) and is an opportunity for everyone to show their support of, affection for and solidarity with the members of our community that work with and understand rocks. This group includes geophysicists and geochemists, hydrogeologists and soil experts, data specialists and explorers, academics and researchers, miners and climate specialists, oil and many energy experts. Much of the science of our planet and even the components we are made from, in the end is based on minerals, that make up rocks.

Advocacy

We updated our submission to the National Review of Research Infrastructure and provided a submission to the Review into Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs). Our objective is to help motivate government to increase the share of Australian research funding that is applied to Geoscience.

Both of our submissions were well received by the government and by our colleagues in the Geoscience community. We have all demonstrated consistent support for UNCOVER, AuScope and other current research.

Our Education Committee has also made a substantial contribution to the Decadal Plan for Earth Sciences that is due to be released before June by the Australian Academy of Science. We see this as well-aligned with our strategic planning approach and we are looking forward to helping disseminate this exciting publication as a blueprint for the coming decade which we see as one of great transition - more about that soon.

Sustainability

AGCC banner

To continue to do what we have started, and to be able to achieve more, we are holding a Convention in 2018 in Adelaide. This will help us achieve two strategies: getting our eight Member Organisations to work together and providing us with more funding to be able to better support our Education and Advocacy strategic pillars.

The AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018) will be held during Earth Science Week next year (14-18 October, 2018). The purpose is to promote Geoscience as a major and essential field of Science in Australia. The theme is Big Issues and Ideas in Geoscience.



The Conference Organising Committee has met and comprises the various Subcommittee Chairs and an Executive. If you are interested in providing a paper, helping develop a Technical Session or championing a Thematic Session please contact:

Dr Chris Yeats - Scientific and Technical Program Convenor
chris.yeats@industry.nsw.gov.au

or myself, Dr Bill Shaw - President of the AGC
president@agc.org.au

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Geoscience Education Views

 Geoscience Education Views is prepared using opinion pieces provided by invited authors. Any views expressed may not reflect the views or policies of the AGC.

 Why are young Australians losing interest in the environment?

Len Altman

An annual national survey of 20, 000 young Australians aged 15-19 has shown an alarming trend over the past decade. These surveys are conducted by the organization Mission Australia and the data is freely available online here.

In 2008 the top issue of personal concern was the environment (18.5%), and in 2011 it was still rated highly, (17.5%). In 2012 however, the figure had dropped so low that the question was taken out of the survey. The most recent (2016) data indicates that the top three issues of personal concern for Australian young people have now become (respectively) coping with stress (44%), school or study problems (37.8%) and body image (30.6%).

The same survey asked young people for their opinions about the most important issues in Australia today. In 2010 respondents thought that the environment was the most important (top) issue (45.7%), which dropped to 17.5% in 2012 and only 11.5% in 2016. The top three national issues are now regarded as being alcohol and drugs (28.7%), discrimination and equity (27%) and mental health (26%). The environment has dropped to 10th place.

As an environmental educator at the senior secondary level I have grave concerns about this trend. I wonder if a similar decline in concern for the environment is occurring elsewhere.

At my local level, (South Australian schools), this trend seems consistent with subject selection by senior secondary (15 – 19 year old) students. The most popular science subjects have become Psychology and Nutrition. The newly introduced Australian Curriculum subject Earth and Environmental Science (EES), has provided opportunity to study topics like Climate Change and Sustainability, in some detail. However, initial interest has been so low that it is likely to be offered in very few schools and then selected by only a handful of students in each of those schools.

Clearly, today's teenagers will become the voters for future governments. It is paramount that these young people are informed and appreciate the big environmental issues of our time. As a teacher, I know that the attitudes and values developed during the school years can endure for a lifetime. I don’t know how to do it, but we need to find ways to raise the profile of environmental education. I believe that it’s a critical tool towards effectively addressing sustainability, climate change and the associated environmental issues of our time. We have only one planet.


Len Altman
Senior Secondary South Australian Science Teacher
and recipient of the 2009 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools
LAltman@msc.sa.edu.au

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Geoscience Education Deadlines, Events & Activities

   Deadlines   
 

 Asian Science Camp 2017
Applications close 11.30pm on Sunday 26 March, 2017.
Teachers must have completed the recommendation form before 11.30pm on Wednesday 29 March 2017.
http://tinyurl.com/zdytw8z.

 Big Science Competition 2017
Registration for pen & paper version closes 19 April 2017
Register before 19 April to win a science experience for the school!
http://tinyurl.com/zn7tvlk.

 2017 National Science Week school grants
Applications for funding close 24 April 2017
http://tinyurl.com/jp7dqzb.

 Big Science Competition 2017
Registration for online version closes 10 May 2017
http://tinyurl.com/zn7tvlk.

 Science Talent Search 2017
Registrations close 29 May 2017
http://www.sciencevictoria.com.au/sts/.

 National Youth Science Forum 2018
Applications close 31 May 2017
http://tinyurl.com/gvfwgy8.

 CONASTA 2017, Hobart 2-12 July
Early bird registration closes 31 May 2017
http://tinyurl.com/zs7wczz.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams
Registrations close for all exams 19 July 2017
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.


   Events and Activities   
 

 TESEP PD in Canberra, 6 March 2017
PD7 - Our Place in Space.

 TESEP PD in Canberra, 7 March 2017
PD4 - Fossil Sunlight & PD8 - Powerful Stuff.

 TESEP PD in Hobart, 15 March 2017
PD1 - Round and Round with Rocks.

 TESEP PD in Hobart, 20 March 2017
PD9 - Plate Tectonics.

 TESEP PD in Hobart, 30 March 2017
PD4 - Fossil Sunlight.

 BEESST conference 2017, Sydney, 24 March 2017
http://tinyurl.com/zyth7p6.

 CONSEA*ACT 2017, Canberra, 25 March 2017
http://tinyurl.com/ztmhghs.

 Geologists Day, World-wide, 2 April
A day of celebration of the profession by the profession around the world.
Read more here: http://www.agc.org.au/.

 SASTA Annual Conference & Expo, Adelaide, 28 April
http://www.sasta.asn.au/professional_learning.

 TESEP PD in Melbourne, 4 May 2017
PD7 - Our Place in Space.

 TESEP PD in Melbourne, 5 May 2017
PD1 - Round and Round with Rocks.

 Big Science Competition 2017
Competitions held any day between 17 & 24 May
http://tinyurl.com/zn7tvlk.

 CONASTA 2017, Hobart, 7-12 July
AGCC banner



http://tinyurl.com/zs7wczz.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams
Registrations close of all exams 19 July 2017
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.

 Australian Science Olympiad Exams, August 2017
   •   Chemistry exam August 2
   •   Earth and Environmental Science exam August 4
   •   Biology exam August 7
   •   Physics exam August 9
See website for more details:
http://tinyurl.com/gpe9ngw.

 Australasian University Geoscience Educators Network meeting, Sydney, 5-6 August
For more information contact kelsiedadd@gmail.com.

 International Earth Science Olympiad 2017, France, 22-29 August
Explore details here and consider sitting the 2017 Australian exams to attend the 2018 summer school and maybe represent Australia at IESO 2018.
http://univ-cotedazur.fr/ieso2017/events/ieso2017.

 AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018), Adelaide, 14-18 October 2018
AGCC banner
 GeoEdLink will list your event here!
If you have an upcoming Earth and Environmental Science education related event GeoEdLink will list its details here. Send your event details to the GeoEdLink editor. An event name, date, location and web site link are essential. The next GeoEdLink will be published in February-March 2017.

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