August 2017 GeoEdLink AGC logo

Your geoscience e-newsletter courtesy of the Australian Geoscience Council

      President's Opening Remarks |President's Report | Geoscience News | Geoscience Views | Geoscience Activities
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From the AGC President - Extract from the President's Report

Bill Shaw

Bill Shaw, AGC President


During the last three months the Australian Geoscience Council (AGC) has been focused on the planning and preparation for our Convention in October 2018. The Organising Committee has now met over a dozen times on a fortnightly basis and the process has developed where we now have a number of Subcommittees all working on the Program, Sponsorship, Field Trips/Workshop components, etc. We have found that this process has resulted in a focus on getting our Membership Organisations (MOs) to all commit personnel to the various aspects of the organisational planning and this has provided effective forums for cooperation. However we need more volunteers from all our MOs to really make this process work. Involvement in committee organisation in the AIG and to a lesser extent in the AusIMM over many years has emphasised to me that the more one puts into this as a volunteer, the more one gets out personally. Over the years I have watched many volunteers develop their abilities and confidence as they participate in strategic planning, organisation, public speaking, finance and reporting. So I encourage any of you reading this and curious about how you can put something back into Geoscience to contact your President and other Representatives on the AGC and step up to help with organising the AGCC 2018. More than with almost any other role we can guarantee you will connect both within your own organisation and across the broader scope of Geoscience.

Vale Dr Phillip Playford AM

The recent death of Dr Phillip Playford AM reminded us all of the inevitable impact of time. Phil was a well-known, renowned geologist who died recently at the age of 85 after a long battle with cancer. His many career highlights include his significant contributions to Western Australian geology on the Devonian limestone reefs of the Canning Basin (GSWA Bulletin 145) and the stromatolites of Shark Bay (GSWA Bulletin 146). He produced a popular guidebook to the geology of Rottnest Island and was a co-discoverer of the Zuytdorp, the first of four early Dutch wrecks to be found off the WA coast. In 1998 he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to knowledge of the geology and history of Australia. He was a President of the Australian Geoscience Council during the mid 1990s. Read more about his contributions here.

Early Career Geoscientists Travel Fund

Applications will soon open again for the Early Career Geoscientists Travel Fund. Details are on our website at http://www.agc.org.au/index.php/grants/igcfund and we again expect to make funds available to fund travel to see interesting rocks and work with interesting people all around the planet. We would like to see more applications from industry and again the basis for success will be your proposed work plan with an emphasis on developing your knowledge, experience and networks. In the past, successful applicants have been those who emphasised their need to visit outcrops as well as attend conferences. Read more about the fund here.

Read my full report here.

AGCC banner

In concluding these opening remarks I encourage you and all of our stakeholders to support the 2018 AGC Convention. Set aside some time to plan your involvement, whether through attending, presenting or partnering, and make sure your 2018 calendar has October 14 - 18 clearly blocked in for the AGCC!





Bill Shaw
President, Australian Geoscience Council

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Editorial

I was recently listening to The Science Show on ABC Radio National and was pleased to hear Dr Tom Raimondo not only talking passionately about his research interests but also about what a geologist is and what they do. Anyone trying to explain this to a teacher or a student would be well advised to use his words verbatim if your own explanations don't come easily or fall short: So when I started out as a geologist, what I liked about it was that it brought together all of these different disciplines. A geochemist is a real occupation, a real profession ... Geologists come in all these different flavours. You can be a geologist who has a specialty in the chemistry of geological problems or the physics of geological problems or the biology of geological problems. And you can just be a geologist that deals with really big-picture things that integrates all of those different disciplines.

This both encapsulates and elegantly identifies a fundamental misunderstanding about the geosciences amongst many students, some teachers and the public: a geologist is not just one occupation! It also sets the stage for a wider discussion of the career directions this multi-flavoured science can provide for students when the only options they are aware of are limited to the mainstream flavours of biology, chemistry, physics and maths albeit with a variety of toppings such as marine, industrial, nuclear and applied etc.

In the interview, Dr Raimondo was also asked if he had always wanted to be a geologist. To me his answer came as no surprise as this is a very common story amongst many mid- to late-career geoscientists that I have spoken with over the years and is also my own experience. It also goes to the heart of why teachers are so important: I didn't study geology at high school. I didn't even know it existed, didn't even know it was a subject you could do. I got to uni and, again, not knowing exactly where I saw myself, I thought I would give geology a try. There was a lecturer at the time [who] gave a really enthusiastic, engaging spiel about volcanoes and earthquakes and all these cool things and I thought, yeah whatever, I'll give it a try. And I loved it really from day one.

Many people engaged in science careers will tell you that there was one teacher, not always a science teacher, at school who inspired them to take the science-career pathway. Dr Raimondo and many like him found their pathway thanks to an excellent experience in the subject in the first year at university. Herein lies two challenges: the first challenge is for all of us. We need to successfully encourage students to transition from high school - with little to no geoscience education - to university and enrol in a course that includes a first year geoscience subject. To do this we need to help increase the exposure of students at all levels, and the general public, to 'geoscience' at every opportunity. The other challenge falls on the shoulders of geoscience teachers at university. For the geosciences to thrive we need to convert a passing interest into the passion you hear in the interview with Dr Raimondo. This is easier said than done but talking about how good the geological flavours taste is a great start!

You can read and hear the full interview here.

Greg McNamara - Editor, GeoEdLink
All feedback and submissions should be sent to the GeoEdLink Editor, Greg McNamara

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Geoscience Education News & Reviews

 National Science Week (August 12 - 20) is here!

There are hundreds of public events (festivals, talks, demonstrations, forums, walks, performance & open days) every year in National Science Week to attend in cities and towns right across the country. Find out what's on here:
https://www.scienceweek.net.au/get-involved/.

 Off to France
Olympiad team
The Australian team members for the International Earth Science Olympiad competition
(left to right) are:
• Chen Zhou - Year 12, North Sydney Boys High School, NSW
• Jemima Jeffree - Year 11, Indooroopilly State High School, Qld
• Joshua Lee - Year 12, Barker College, NSW
• YiJie Neo - Year 12, John Monash Science School, Vic

The national team to represent Australia at the 2017 International Earth Science Olympiad (IESO) in Nice, France, was announced at a ceremony in Canberra in June. The four students selected to compete at the IESO are amongst 17 students representing Australia in the Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science and Physics Olympiads. The AGC supports the Australian Earth and Environmental Science Olympiad program and congratulates the students on their achievement, wishing them all the best for the competition starting 20 August.
http://tinyurl.com/y9cmk9k3.

 All at sea on the JOIDES Resolution - join them live!

It is not too late for you and your students to join Queensland teacher Deb Beamish aboard the JOIDES Resolution (JR) for a ship to shore link to find out all about the current leg. She is eager to share this exciting opportunity with all students keen to be in a live broadcast with scientists onboard the JR. This vessel travels the world conducting research on past climate change and Earth's amazing geological history. From July 27 to September 29, the JR will be off the coast of Australia. Scientists on board from around the world are ready to talk to your students about their work and life at sea, LIVE! Sign up here - http://joidesresolution.org/live-video-events-with-the-joides-resolution/ - to take advantage of this unique and exciting opportunity. Live events are free but they are first come, first served and the schedule does fill up!
http://joidesresolution.org/expedition/371/.

 NAPLAN results mixed

While the usefulness of NAPLAN may be contentious the results from the most recent analysis suggests some improvements in achievement levels with gains across the board in reading and numeracy since 2008 concomitant with a drop in writing since 2011.
http://tinyurl.com/ybdeepe4.

 STEM X Academy applications open soon

The STEM X Academy five-day residential teacher professional learning program is open to Australian teachers across all sectors and levels of experience. With limited spaces available, interested applicants will need to fill in and submit an online application form that will open on 14 August and will then be available here. Teachers will have one month to submit their application. With interest in this program at an all-time high, we encourage you to put your application in as soon as possible. Successful applicants will be asked to make a small one-off contribution of $485 which goes towards supporting the costs associated with the program. This contribution will cover flights to and from Canberra and the participant's closest major airport, meals and accommodation throughout the program and access to all venues and activities.
Download the STEM X booklet here.
http://asta.edu.au/programs/stemx.

 Discover Volcanism – Hawaii, February and July 2018.
Teachers on Hawaii
Great company, great rocks, fantastic trip!


See amazing volcanism first-hand and explore the active volcanoes of Hawaii for a week with a group of like-minded geoscience enthusiasts. The eight day Discover Volcanism trip is based in Hilo, Hawaii and takes the group through the basics of Plate Tectonics, hot-spot volcanism, volcano life cycles, volcanic products and more. Collect data, samples and learn how to develop scientific field notes and map in the field and in a lava cave. Participants also visit an active volcano observatory, a tea farm and winery, historical parks and learn about local traditions and culture that has developed through living with the hazards of volcanic activity. Also examine examples of engineering solutions to some unusual hazard problems in Hawaii. There is even time to walk on a black and green sand beach, swim in volcanically heated hot pools and snorkel on a coral reef with turtles and dolphins (if they appear).

The trip caters for a small number of people so that personalised learning experiences can happen for all the participants. The trip is also not overly expensive, with all the land transport, accommodation, breakfasts, some dinners, park entry fees covered. All you need to do is get to and from Hilo, Hawaii and make your field lunches and you're almost set. The February trip is open for everyone, the July trip is especially for teachers!

For more information you can visit http://geoetc.com/field-adventures/ or email Gary Lewis on gary@geoetc.com for more details.



 Hawaii - Land of Fire, September 23 to October 1, 2017.

Carefully crafted, curriculum linked itinerary specifically designed in conjunction with ASTA for teacher PD.

Teachers on Hawaii
This tour is escorted by Suzie Urbaniak,
winner of the 2016 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence
in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools and a Geologist.
➤ Take a Lava Boat ride to see the lava entering the Pacific Ocean, an unforgettable sight (extra charge may apply)
➤ See the olive green sand at Papakolea (Green Sand Beach), which gets its colour from olivine crystals created by volcanic eruptions
➤ Walk on newly formed crust, steps away from flowing lava
➤ Drive from sea level to over 4,000 metres in around 2 hours
➤ Experience the Zipline Tour of the Umauma Falls (optional)
➤ Explore one of the island’s best kept secrets, a volcano where you can see craters, eruptive fissures, lava tunnels, spatter ribbon, cinders and much more
➤ View the late stage rift between the two shield volcanoes – Waianae and Koolau
➤ Hike the world’s most recognised volcanic crater – Diamond Head

For more information download the flyer.



   On-line resources - links and reviews   
 

 Future Earth digital teacher resource book for National Science Week

The 2017 88 page teacher resource book is divided into 3 sections - Early Years (F-2), Primary Years (3-6) and Secondary Years (7-10). Each section has a number of activities to support students' involvement in investigating, exploring, experimenting, designing, creating and communicating their understanding about what's involved in attaining and maintaining a sustainable 'Future Earth. It gives students the opportunity to explore and research a range of real-world scenarios. To further support teachers and students, two students journals are available to download.
Download the 18Mb PDF version here.
Download the 13Mb PDF version here.
Explore the web-based flip book here.
Find links to all the resources here.

 Earth and Environmental Science textbooks in demand

The implementation of the Australian Curriculum's Earth and Environmental Science subject, for Year 11 and 12 students, starting (or already started) in many states the new textbooks from Earth Science Western Australia (ESWA) are becoming very popular. For more information or to buy online visit the ESWA site:
http://tinyurl.com/lwpf4jb.

 JPL resources rocket to a new level

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory education web site has a fantastic array of classroom activities to explore, download and enjoy with students. Many are low tech but others explore high tech ideas and use the latest in smart phone apps and web-based processing. While written for students and teachers in the United States most are easily adapted for classrooms in Australia. Definitely check them out!
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/.

 ESWA resources are ticking all the boxes

For those preparing to teach Earth and Space Science later this year the free resource packages available for Years 4-10 under the Woodside Australian Science Project (WASP) are a must to explore. They were excellent when first rolled out but are now even better; coming with new posters for Years 4-6 and new materials for Years 7 and 8! Quizzes will be available online soon too!
http://www.wasp.edu.au/

For teachers of Years 1 to 5 the Primary Australian Literacy Mathematics and Science (PALMS) program has excellent STEM resource packages as well. Find them here:
http://www.palms.edu.au/

Wait, there's more! A free workshop for the new Year 5 package will be held at the Australian Resources Research Centre, Kensington, WA from 4-5:30pm on the 12th of September.
To register follow this link.

 New portal to Mars

Some of the most accessible and engaging Earth Science can be found on Mars via the new portal opened by NASA's mar Exploration Program. This new window on Mars allows access to data from all current missions on or in orbit around Mars with clear graphics and excellent supporting text. A must for student engagement and extension activities for those who dream of exploring the solar system!
https://mars.nasa.gov/mars-exploration/

 Planning a field trip to the western USA?

New field trip guides for the north western United States add to the amazing array of field guides for that nation and will be of special interest to anyone planning to visit the Cascades, the Columbia River Basalt and Mt St Helens.
Field-trip guide to a volcanic transect of the Pacific Northwest: http://tinyurl.com/y79y4r96
Field-Trip guide to Mount St. Helens, Washington: http://tinyurl.com/y7kj7ke8

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President's Report

Australian Geoscience Council - President's Report to the General Meeting
by Dr Bill Shaw

During the last three months the Australian Geoscience Council (AGC) has been focused on the planning and preparation for our Convention in October 2018. The Organising Committee has now met over a dozen times on a fortnightly basis and the process has developed where we now have a number of Subcommittees all working on the Program, Sponsorship, Field Trips/Workshop components, etc. We have found that this process has resulted in a focus on getting our Membership Organisations (MOs) to all commit personnel to the various aspects of the organisational planning and this has provided effective forums for cooperation. However we need more volunteers from all our MOs to really make this process work. Involvement in Committee organisation in the AIG and to a lesser extent in the AusIMM over many years has emphasised to me that the more one puts into this as a volunteer, the more one gets out personally. Over the years I have watched many volunteers develop their abilities and confidence as they participate in strategic planning, organisation, public speaking, finance and reporting. So I encourage any of you reading this and curious about how you can "put something back" into Geoscience to contact your President and other Representatives on the AGC and step up to help with organising the AGCC 2018. More than with almost any other role we can guarantee you will connect both within your own organisation and across the broader scope of Geoscience.

In particular the Sponsorship Subcommittee has nearly finalised our partnership pack and brochure, and now the process of contacting sponsors to support all aspects of the Convention next year is underway. The IGC in Brisbane was a tremendous financial success for us and has provided the opportunity to support Geoscience through many worthwhile programmes. Our objective has been to invest those funds wisely in providing seed funding and support for worthwhile ideas and established organisations, particularly in Geoscience Education. We have provided modest support for ESWA, TESEP, AUGEN and GeoEdLink and we are always on the lookout for other opportunities. We have also funded the AAS-AGC Travel Fund for Early Career Geoscientists. Now we are seeking to rebuild our funds through the Convention next year so that we can continue this worthwhile practice. So you have every reason to engage with us to help build the foundations and support for Geoscience careers.

Vale Dr Phillip Playford AM

The recent death of Dr Phillip Playford AM reminded us all of the inevitable impact of time. Phil was a well-known, renowned geologist who died recently at the age of 85 after a long battle with cancer. His many career highlights include his significant contributions to Western Australian geology on the Devonian limestone reefs of the Canning Basin (GSWA Bulletin 145) and the stromatolites of Shark Bay (GSWA Bulletin 146). He produced a popular guidebook to the geology of Rottnest Island and was a co-discoverer of the Zuytdorp, the first of four early Dutch wrecks to be found off the WA coast. In 1998 he was made a Member of the Order of Australia for his contributions to knowledge of the geology and history of Australia. He was a President of the Australian Geoscience Council during the mid 1990s. There is more information about Philip at these links:
http://www.abc.net.au/radio/perth/programs/mornings/dr-philip-playford/8514184
http://www.rswa.org.au/scientists/playford.aspx
http://perthmoderniansociety.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Annual-Orations-2014-Geologists-life.pdf

I knew Phil Playford primarily through my early association with the AGC in the early 1990s as I was then President of the AIG (remember that you make very interesting long-term contacts through volunteer roles). We know he was President of the AGC in the mid-1990s but there was not much detail in our records. This has prompted the AGC to research and resurrect our early history to ensure that this is not completely lost. The process has already turned up some interesting information in glossy AGC Annual Reports from the early 1980s that we were not aware of, one of which contained the following:

The concept of an Australian Geoscience Council emerged in mid-1975 when it was recommended to the Australian Government by the Bureau Of Mineral Resources (BMR) and others that an advisory national geoscience council was needed to rationalise geoscientific studies carried out by Commonwealth organisations. The proposition was supported and investigated by the Geological Society of Australia (GSA) in May 1976 by examining the development of geoscience councils in other countries. During 1979 meetings were held in April and May attended by representatives of seven geoscientific societies and organisations to discuss the case for the possible establishment of a national Australian Geoscience Council. As a result of these meetings a proposal to establish a Council, together with a draft Constitution and By-Laws, was circulated to potential member societies for consideration. In 1980, at meetings in September and October, agreement was reached between representatives of the seven geoscientific societies which comprised the inaugural Members of the Council on a formal proposal to be presented to each society for ratification. The inaugural meeting of the Australian Geoscience Council was held on 11 September, 1981, in Adelaide.

There is thus already a long tradition in Australia of cooperation among our various geoscience Member Organisations to provide our Federal and State Governments with advice in the interests of Australian Geoscience. We plan to continue to build on this advocacy role over the coming two years as our strategic programme continues to benefit all of us.

Early Career Geoscientists Travel Fund

Before closing, I note that applications will soon open again for the Early Career Geoscientists Travel Fund. Details are on our website at http://www.agc.org.au/index.php/grants/igcfund and we again expect to make funds available to fund travel to see interesting rocks and work with interesting people all around the planet. We would like to see more applications from industry and again the basis for success will be your proposed work plan with an emphasis on developing your knowledge, experience and networks. In the past, successful applicants have been those who emphasised their need to visit outcrops as well as attend conferences. However this year we are going to support an additional number of geoscientists with funds to attend the AGCC 2018 in Adelaide during Earth Science Week next year. Here we will be looking for people who can help make this event a success by planning and organising technical sessions, workshops, fieldtrips or volunteering in other capacities. Please visit our website for ways to connect with the Early Career and Volunteers Subcommittee.

AGCC banner

* * * *

The AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018) will be held during Earth Science Week next year (14-18 October, 2018). The purpose is to promote Geoscience as a major and essential field of Science in Australia. The theme is Big Issues and Ideas in Geoscience.

If you are interested in providing a paper, helping develop a Technical Session or championing a Thematic Session please contact:

Dr Chris Yeats - Scientific and Technical Program Convenor
chris.yeats@industry.nsw.gov.au

or myself, Dr Bill Shaw - President of the AGC
president@agc.org.au

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Geoscience Education Views

 Geoscience Education Views is prepared using opinion pieces provided by invited authors. Any views expressed may not reflect the views or policies of the AGC.

 The School of Rock 2017: Suzy's JOIDES Resolution experience

Suzy Urbaniak
Suzy Urbaniak onboard the JOIDES Resolution

Suzy Urbaniak's award winning achievements were highlighted in GeoEdLink last year and are well worth reading if you are unfamiliar with her work. Suzy never stands still and, in the latest instalment of her amazing career, she has just returned from the School of Rock aboard the JOIDES Resolution.

From Subic Bay in the Philippines to Townsville, Queensland, Suzy travelled with fifteen early career scientists, secondary science educators and 5 university instructors from the USA, Australia and Brazil. This was an educational professional development experience second to none, undertaken on the unique research vessel - the JOIDES Resolution (JR). The JR is a world class floating scientific laboratory with the motto: Science in Search of Earth's Secrets.

The School of Rock (SoR), is a project connecting research, industry and education. It is designed to showcase the research themes of:

  •  Climate and Ocean Change: Reading the Past, Informing the Future
  •  Biosphere Frontiers: Deep Life and Environmental Forcing of Evolution
  •  Earth Connections: Deep Processes and their Impact on Earth's Surface Environment
  •  Earth in Motion: Processes and Hazards on Human Time Scales

within a unique classroom experience. The SoR is an exemplar of a community educational outreach program, which has been promoting geoscience awareness and education throughout the United States of America and its associated member nations since 2009. This opportunity enriches its delegates with improved technical skills and contextual knowledge through the demonstration and undertaking of cutting edge scientific, exploration techniques, such as smear slides and core microscopy. The JR is a diverse, dynamic and collaborative landscape that enables organic discussions embedded within leading edge science. Frontier scientists and marine technicians who share a high quality skill set and passion with enthusiastic secondary and university educators professionally lead SoR.

JR as a CoRE (Centre of Resources Excellence) Exemplar

Suzy has developed a contemporary education model known as CoRE (Centre of Resources Excellence) which itself is based on 5 pillars of community inclusivity known as SWANS (STEM/STEAM, Women in Leadership, Aboriginal Culture, Networking & Sustainability). CoRE's motto is #therealclassroom. It takes students through a learning journey which evolves their enterprising skills and develops their scientific technical skills to support their capability to acquire knowledge to problem-solve real-world problems. Students operate within collaborative business units, acknowledging individual talents to undertake a series of STEAM based elements. Suzy says, CoRE creates an environment for STEM career awareness. It promotes the development of young scientists, engineers and technicians through scientific inquiry and investigation within an experiential and collaborative project based learning environment. She notes, the JR operations are a real world demonstration of STEM/STEAM education objectives. The JR operating system can be interpreted as a real world analogue of the CoRE teaching - learning program, which was implemented at Kent Street Senior High School, Western Australia in 2016. .

21st Century Relevance

To problem solve 21st century societal and environmental challenges it is paramount that geoscience literacy becomes mainstream in Australia K-12 education. Education models based on STEM/STEAM pedagogies such as CoRE are critical to ensure that students are learning within a #therealclassroom context. For Suzy, the SoR 2017 experience showcased the connection between the CoRE Model, industry and education.

BBQ on the picnic deck
Suzy on the picnic deck for a BBQ with fellow JOIDES Resolution travellers
Image source: http://tinyurl.com/y9bfoflw

The JR expeditions are about discovery; discovery of Earth's deep secrets. To ensure that the overarching objectives of each future expedition are realized, future scientists, technicians and operations personnel need to possess the appropriate credentials and technical scientific skills. Such attributes begin with quality STEM/STEAM education; a modern and contemporary approach which needs to be embedded into 21st Century K - 12 curriculum. This work is about bringing the world together through science outside of rigid classrooms. Suzy encourages teachers with the enthusiasm to drive change to apply for these types of opportunities. Find out more about opportunities aboard the JOIDES Resolution here.


Suzy Urbaniak teaches at Kent Street Senior High School, Western Australia
and is recipient of the 2016 Prime Minister's Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching in Secondary Schools
suzy.urbaniak@education.wa.edu.au

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Geoscience Education Deadlines, Events & Activities

   Deadlines   
 

 TESEP PD events, Hobart, 21 & 22 August
http://tesep.org.au/tasmania.html.

 TESEP PD events, Melbourne, 30 & 31 August
http://tesep.org.au/victoria.html.

 Science Fair entries due, Canberra, 25-26 August
http://tinyurl.com/lqxo2uo.

 TESEP PD events, Melbourne, 1 September
http://tesep.org.au/victoria.html.

 STEM X Academy applications close, 14 September
http://asta.edu.au/programs/stemx.

 TESEP PD events, Hobart, 14 & 15 September
http://tesep.org.au/tasmania.html.

 64th Queensland Science contest 2017, Brisbane, 9 October 2017
Register by October 9, entries due October 13 to 14.
http://tinyurl.com/lhr6fre.

 TESEP PD events, Ballarat, 29, 30 & 31 October
http://tesep.org.au/victoria.html.

 TESEP PD events, Canberra, 5 & 5 December
http://tesep.org.au/australian-capital-territory.html.


   Events and Activities   
 

 Designing STEM Tasks - Primary Years, Adelaide, 14 August
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

 Teaching Inspiring K-6 Science: Twilight Workshops, Sydney, 17 August
http://tinyurl.com/y8gjamf5.

 International Earth Science Olympiad 2017, France, 22-29 August
Explore details here and consider sitting the 2017 Australian exams to attend the 2018 summer school and maybe represent Australia at IESO 2018.
http://univ-cotedazur.fr/ieso2017/events/ieso2017.

 STAV STEM Conference, Melbourne, 25 August
http://tinyurl.com/ybc57gue.

 Science Fair entries due, Canberra, 25-26 August
http://tinyurl.com/lqxo2uo.

 Improving STEM Education, Melbourne, 29-30 August
http://tinyurl.com/n372zcu.

 Teaching Inspiring K-6 Science: Twilight Workshops, Sydney, 31 August
http://tinyurl.com/y8gjamf5.

 Teaching Inspiring K-6 Science: Twilight Workshops, Sydney, 7 September
http://tinyurl.com/y8gjamf5.

 SASTA STEM Project - Middle Years, Adelaide, 7-8 September
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

 STEM Education Conference 2017, Perth, 28-29 September
http://tinyurl.com/yceyyoya.

 64th Queensland Science contest 2017, Brisbane, 9 October 2017
Register by October 9, entries due October 13 to 14.
http://tinyurl.com/lhr6fre.

 Planning STEM in 2018, Melbourne, 11 October 2017
This STEM workshop will allow teachers to develop ideas and tasks for their school in 2018.
http://tinyurl.com/y7vcsypn.

 SASTA Early Careers Teachers Conference 2017, Adelaide, 13 October 2017
Primary Years
http://tinyurl.com/m7g9vaw.

 STAVCON, the annual conference of the Science Teachers’ Association of Victoria, Melbourne, 1 December 2017
Primary Years
http://tinyurl.com/me2uucw.

 STEM (6-11) Conference 2017, Adelaide, 1 December
http://tinyurl.com/nrmwwh8.

    
✱✱✱  2018  ✱✱✱



 Australasian Exploration Geoscience Conference, February 18-21, 2018
http://www.aegc2018.com.au/
AEGC banner


 8th GeoSciEd Conference and 8th EnsinoGEO, Campinas Brazil, July 22-27, 2018
http://tinyurl.com/m7r4gc7.

 AGC Convention 2018 (AGCC 2018), Adelaide, 14-18 October 2018
https://www.agcc.org.au/
AGCC banner
 GeoEdLink will list your event here!
If you have an upcoming Earth and Environmental Science education related event GeoEdLink will list its details here. Send your event details to the GeoEdLink editor. An event name, date, location and web site link are essential. The next GeoEdLink will be published in July-August 2017.

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